Extreme Medicine Conference Series
International World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo
Medicine, the most exciting job on earth

Programme

We have extremely exciting content and globally renowned speakers lined up for November’s World Extreme Medicine Conference, under the key areas of Expedition, Wilderness, Extreme, Disaster, Humanitarian and Pre-hospital medicine.

Speakers and content are subject to change, please check back regularly for updates to the schedule in the run-up to the conference. Thank you.

The World Extreme Medicine Conference is organised as ‘Not for Profit’ activity by WEM.

Event overview
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Day 1
(Saturday, November 25th)
Extreme, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine and workshops/ seminars
  • Extreme, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

  • BIOSPHERE

    07.30 – 08.15Registration & Coffee

    08.15 – 08.30Mark HannafordIntroducing Extreme Medicine

    08.30 – 9.00Pen Haddow
    Alone to the North Pole … and Why?Pen reveals some of the less frequently talked about aspects of surviving and travelling on the Arctic Ocean after 25 years of sea-ice work; and then broadens his scope to highlight revelations from his recently returned pioneering yacht voyage into the North Pole’s international waters.

    09.00 – 9.30Chris Press
    It’ll never happen… (The Polar Bear Incident)Introduction to Svalbard; introduction to Bears; Where we were; what we did; sequence of events from my perspective and the story of what was happening elsewhere; the inquiry and legal process afterwards; lessons to learn and open to discussion.

    09.30 – 10.00Andrew Murray
    Minimising Illness & Maximising PerformanceThe difference between Olympic Gold and 4th place is on average 0.4%. Small things, done consistently can be the difference between a successful expedition and failure. Dr Andrew Murray shares top tips for maximising performance both in the elite, and extreme environments, and simple concrete actions that can prevent illness and help people spend more time on the trail and less time sitting on the toilet.

    10.00 – 10.30Nathan Smith
    Future Perspectives On Temporal Dynamics In Extreme EnvironmentsThe time-based changes in psychological functioning that occur during long-duration missions. Various stage-adaptation models will be explored before raising some contentious and heavily-debated topics, including the existence of a ‘third-quarter phenomenon’. How knowledge of critical phases in relation to psychological functioning might allow us to design effective countermeasures to mitigate against breakdown. Current measurement advances will be highlighted and new approaches for monitoring cognition, affect and behaviour in extreme settings will be discussed.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Simon KingNaked & AfraidFollowing last year’s successful “Naked and Afraid” workshop, new cases and stories will be brought to the session and refined insights regarding the six key skills will be presented. This is the result of ongoing work into the cognitive impact of situational stress and resource deprivation.

    11.30 – 12.00Mike BarrattHuman Performance in Austere Environments; Lessons from NASA

    12.00 – 12.30Chris Imray
    Updates in Cold Injuries

    12.30 – 13.00Dr Dan Roiz de SaHeat IllnessDan will give an update into heat illness, including that caused by exertion, its prevention, recognition & treatment. And will discuss the crossover with exertional rhabdomyolysis and deciding when it is safe to return to exercise activity after suffering from the effects of exertion related hyperthermia.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Mike TiptonCold Water Immersion; Hazards, Protection & Treatment

    14.30 – 15.00Mike Barratt, Marc O Griofa, Nathan Smith & Beth HealeySpace PanelSpaceflight Analogues for future exploratory missions / long duration missions.

    15.00 – 15.30Adrian MellorAcute Mountain Sickness; Role of Exercise in Pathogenesis

    15.30 – 16.00Nick CarterHigh Latitude Sailing Expeditions

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Marc O GriofaNEEMO

    17.00 – 17.30Luca Carenzo
    Ultrasound in Austere Environments

    17.30 – 17.45Malcolm HiltonIntroduction to MSc in Extreme MedicineWith the increased awareness of global burdens such as humanitarian crises and sudden onset disasters, more than ever there is a need to be delivering healthcare in highly complex and demanding situations. This unique programme is delivered in partnership between the University of Exeter Medical School and World Extreme Medicine.

    17.45 – 18.30Mark Beaumont & Laura PenhaulAround the World in 80 Days

  • SALISBURY ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSPlaces are limited for these sessions and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here, a £5 booking fee will be applied.

    07.30 – 8.30Registration & Coffee

    8.30 – 9.00Rachel Anderson Everest Base Camp Clinic

    09.00 – 9.30Nathan Smith Psychological Profiling and Behaviour ObservationWe will cover a variety of psychological profiling tools for assessing the personality, personal values and coping strategies of expedition team members. The measures discussed will be well-grounded in psychological theory and have been used extensively in extreme environment settings. Based on your own responses to the survey, you will build a personal expeditioner profile and identify how your characteristics might affect your response to stress.

    9.30 – 10.00Joe Rowles Medical training for Anti-Poaching teams in The Democratic Republic of CongoGaramba National Park is one of Africa’s oldest national parks, located in the northern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo where it borders South Sudan. Heavily armed poachers, often former members of the Lord’s Resistance Army or Sudan People’s Liberation Army, have killed 4 rangers in the last year. As part of the response to increasing levels of violence and poaching the park’s managers have enlisted a UK organisation to provide training and mentoring for the park rangers. Dr Joe Rowles is the lead for medical training and will discuss the challenges of providing training to local rangers in such a remote and hostile environment.

    10.00 – 10.30Sean HudsonWhats In My Bag

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Laura PenhaulPhysio for Extreme Environments

    11.30 – 12.00Will SmithBringing Combat Medicine to the WildernessAdvancement of prehospital care on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan is pushing a new approach to EMS and Remote/Wilderness medical care. This lecture will look at some of the hot topics of tourniquet use, hemostatic agents and rearranging our ABC’s to CAB. Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) and Rescue Task Force (RTF) concepts will be introduced as an approach to mass violence and active shooter situations and how they can be extrapolated to use in the Wilderness.

    12.00 – 13.00Ted Welman & Jack FaulknerDoctors AdriftTwo junior doctors who rowed across the Indian Ocean in support of Médecins Sans Frontières during their “FY3” year. This lecture is the story of how they fought the elements in their 7 metre rowing boat, “Hope”, to complete the 3,600 mile journey from Western Australia to Mauritius. The boys spent 56 days battling extreme heat, 50ft waves and dodging their fair share of cargo ships before reaching Mauritius in record time. They will be sharing tales from their incredible adventure as well as discussing some of the medical problems they encountered en route, including salt sores, hand contractures, severe weight loss and sleep deprivation.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Matthew BoulterJungle heat exhaustion – casevac or continue?Exertional heat injury in the hot and humid climate of the jungle presents a host of medical complexities. Casevac is often not an easy option and clinicians are required to make difficult decisions regarding casualty management. We have a developed a simple experience based tool to support clinical decision making in this extreme environment.

    14.30 – 15.00Will SmithMountain Medicine – Where Ambulances Can’t GoMountain medicine tailors traditional medical skills and applies them to the wilderness and other austere settings. This case study based lecture discusses the many realms of Search and Rescue as well as other wilderness settings and discusses medical adaptations that must be made in each to optimize patient care and minimize risk to the patient and rescuers.

    15.00 – 15.30Dan Roiz de SaWalking with the Wounded: from severe injury to the ends of the earthWalking With The Wounded is a charity which aims to support wounded veterans back into the work place. It is known for undertaking expeditions into extreme places as a way of raising the Charity’s Profile and showcasing the extraordinary feats people are capable of achieving. The Institute of Naval Medicine through Dan has helped with background preparation and medical support for these expeditions including the Allied South Pole Challenge which saw 3 teams of injured personnel from 4 countries along with Prince Harry prepare and Ski into the South Pole. This talk will discuss some of the challenges & problems encountered along the way.

    15.30 – 16.00Paul SnapeA year working with the San Bushmen in the Kalahari DesertLearn the non-romanticised history of the San – thought to be the oldest people of Southern Africa and the current situation of the San in the Namibian Kalahari Desert.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Luca AlfattiHow to get your first job as an expedition medicThis talk is aimed at health care professionals wanting to get their first experience/job as an expedition medic. It will include what you can do to prepare, what courses could be useful to attend and tips on what companies to contact and how to present yourself.

    17.00 – 17.45Jamie Facer-Childs, Ollie Stoten & Alex BrazierAn Antarctic Journey: The adventure and what we learnt from itThe story of the first British Team to traverse Antarctica. 67 days on the ice, surviving the Antarctic environment and the team work of a prolonged expedition. A doctor’s perspective on medical problems in a remote wilderness. What we learnt from the expedition. A brief overview of research findings from the expedition and what more can we do to understand physiology in the extreme.

  • HUTTON ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSZac Poulton & Josh Bakker-DyosOutdoors skills package, polar travel, crevasse rescue, simple rope techniques, improvised stretchers.Places are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

  • BOARD ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS

    9.00 – 10.30Phil McKenna – Blizzard SurvivalIO WorkshopsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning Break

    11.00 – 13.00Chris Storey & Tamara Banerjee – ATACCPenthrox Administration CoursesPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Luca CarenzoUSS SessionsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Jason Young Altitude Research: A Student’s PerspectiveJason will recount his experiences as a research lead on the APEX 5 expedition, a high altitude research group that ascended 4,800m in Bolivia last summer. Led by six medical students, 34 Edinburgh undergraduates spent a week at high altitude to study aspects of innate immunity, coagulation, vision and psychology.
    Places are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

  • CLASS ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS

    9.30 – 12.00Burjor Langdana Expedition DentistryBurjor gives his unmissable practical session on the management of common dental conditions with limited resources in austere environments.
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

    12.00 – 13.00Chloe BakerCrossing the Congo; Keeping Three Fools Alive (including a book signing)In June 2013 three friends, a photojournalist, an ex army officer and a doctor, set out to cross the Democratic Republic of the Congo in an old Land Rover 90 – something they are possibly the first people to have achieved. And for good reason – besides an absence of roads, the car breaking terrain, fire ants, axe wounds, corrupt officials and suspicious villagers seemed to conspire to thwart them at every stage. Their book, Crossing the Congo, is a travelogue of adventures written from the ex army officer’s point of view.
    Spaces are limited for this session and must be booked in advance here.

    14.00 – 16.00MIME Technologies LtdTechnology at the ExtremesDo you know your VR from your AR? Your AI from your Raspberry PI? Your drone from your phone? If not this interactive workshop is for you! Technology in care is progressing at an ever faster pace, and it’s often tricky to keep up. But how do we exploit these technologies, which sometimes suffer from teething problems, and can even be subjected to cyber attacks because the world is more connected than ever? Do technologies help or hinder when it comes to extreme medicine?
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

Day 2
(Sunday, November 26th)
Disaster and Humanitarian Medicine
  • Disaster & Humanitarian Medicine

  • BIOSPHERE: Disaster & Humanitarian Medicine

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee 

    08.30 – 08.30Welcome

    08.30 – 09.00Saleyha Ahsan and Natalie RobertsMedics Under Fire

    09.00 – 9.30Natalie RobertsCholera & Conflict: The Secret Mass Killer2017 has been the year of cholera, particularly in war zones – from Yemen to Nigeria, Congo to Somalia, more people are dying from this easily treatable and preventable diarrhoeal disease than from injuries. Why are there such strong links between conflict and cholera, how can you prepare yourself and what should you do if you find yourself in the middle of an outbreak?

    9.30 – 10.00Peter Skelton
    WHO Emergency Medical Team Specialist Cells in Disasters The development of dedicated spinal injury and rehabilitation teams for disaster response

    10.00 – 10.30Karen OneillSave the Children Migrant Crisis Response: Search and Rescue – Saving Lives at SeaThe Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: an unprecedented number of people have embarked on the perilous journey from the shores of North Africa attempting to cross the sea to seek a safe life in Europe. Save the Children is one of the charities conducting this fundamental life-saving work at sea. Karen worked as an emergency nurse on board their ship, the Vos Hestia. In her presentation, Karen will share with you her two-month journey of working as a nurse on board the ship and what it was like to care for people rescued from the water.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Hamish De Bretton GordonChemical Weapon Use In The Middle East – The New Norm?When the international community didn’t act after the Redline was crossed on 21 Aug 2013 and up to 1500 people were killed by the deadly nerve agent Sarin in East Ghouta, the 100 year taboo over the use of chemical weapons was well and truly broken, possibly forever, until possibly President Trumps air strikes after the 4 April 2017 Sarin attacks in Syria. Chemical weapons are now the ‘norm’.

    11.30 – 12.00Henry Dowlen
    Yemen – Dancing on the heads of snakesIn 2017 the global media was intermittently focused on the cholera outbreak in Yemen and the role of external actors in the ongoing conflict. These two issues are just the ears of the hippo. In this talk the complexity of this particular health emergency will be explored, and an appraisal made of the approaches taken to provide humanitarian assistance to the people in a country that gave the world coffee but cannot now feed itself.

    12.00 – 12.30Pauline Cutting
    Saleyha Ahsan interviews Pauline on ‘Surgery in a Palestinian Refugee Camp under Siege in Lebanon’Dr Saleyha Ahsan will be in conversation with the doctor who inspired her to enter humanitarian medicine, Mrs Pauline Cutting, OBE FRCS. In the 1980s Pauline volunteered to work in a besieged Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon with Medical Aid for Palestine, during the height of the Lebanese conflict. Despite the harrowing conditions she continued to provide medical services, often operating with limited resources and many lives were saved. Her reports from the besieged camp on the BBC World Service shed light into a harrowing humanitarian situation which ultimately supported the breaking of the siege.

    12.30 – 13.00Jon BardenBlurred LinesExploring the appropriate use of civilian and military medical response.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Roger AlcockImproving the international medical response to sudden onset disasters

    14.30 – 15.00Nick Gent
    TBC

    15.00 – 15.30Josie Gilday
    Humanitarian nursing, the frontline in developing countriesJosie will talk about her experience as a humanitarian nurse ‘the jack of all trades’!

    15.30 – 16.00Tom Potokar
    Burns in ConflictBurn injuries often increase in conflicts due to unreliable power supplies, alternative heating and lighting sources, overcrowding and unsafe environments as well as direct combat injuries. At the same time the disruption to health services, decrease in availability of specialist care and disrupted training, means the skilled knowledge and expertise to treat burns is diminished. More often than not it will be general surgeons, general practitioners and doctors and nurses who have been forced by circumstance and experience to become ad hoc trauma specialists that will be looking after these patients.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Daniel SedgewickHow to Say “Don’t Shoot Me” in 350 Different Languages.For those practising medicine in conflict torn areas, working under the constant threat of bombing and gunfire is a daily reality. This talk outlines how the Geneva Conventions and Red Cross emblems provide protection for the sick and injured in conflict, and those who care for them, as well as considering the challenges and threats to international humanitarian law in the changing face of modern warfare.

    17.00 – 17.40Benji WaterhouseThe Ayahuasca DiariesViewing medicine through different eyes…

  • SALISBURY ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSPlaces are limited for these sessions and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here, a £5 booking fee will be applied.

    08.30 – 09.00Jamie WillsonA Short History Of Landmine Medicine In The Ukraine

    09.00 – 9.30Team RubiconSelf-sufficiency In Austere Environments (kit)What happens when things go wrong? Planning for a casualty evacuation

    9.30 – 10.00Chrissy AlcockMedicine as a Weapon / Health in ConflictDescribed as the deadliest urban conflict since World War II, the battle to retake Mosul from the so called Islamic State triggered a complex humanitarian crisis. This necessitated innovative approaches to health care delivery and coordination between both traditional and novel actors. Chrissy will share and discuss these approaches as well as the challenges and rewards that she experienced whilst coordinating and leading the WHO commissioned Trauma Field Hospital in Mosul.

    10.00 – 10.30Sarah WookeyIs There Wine in The Congo?Why Sarah chose MSF and her thoughts on Chad

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 12.00Tom PotokarPractical Burn TriageThis session will cover the basics of burn triage in a multiple casualty scenario and include a simulation exercise where participants will get the opportunity to undertake rapid assessment and triage followed by interactive discussion on decision making in burn care in the austere environment.

    12.00 – 12.30Matt NewportEbola: the bad and the ugly of humanitarian assistanceAn interactive workshop highlighting the day to day realities and challenges of humanitarian assistance

    12.30 – 13.00Tim ByromLeadership In The Disaster SettingThere are plenty of well-known models on leadership, but what actually makes a true leader? Are leaders naturally graced with the ability to lead, or do they nurture their ability? Tim examines leadership in the disaster response setting drawing on his experiences in the military, NHS and UKEMT.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Peter Higgins & Nigel HarlingSecurity on the Disaster Deployment

    15.00 – 17.30Russell Drew & Nick CranfieldLiving Out of a Vehicle£10 – Outdoors SessionPart 1: Mobility/ Vehicle Ownership. Vehicle selection Intro to 4×4 / suspension systems; Vehicle Loading & Expedient Repair.
    Part 2: Mobility / Basic Vehicle Maintenance. Vehicle First Parade, Running Checks and Last Parade; Fault finding; Jacking / Supporting and Safe Practices
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

  • HUTTON ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSPlaces are limited for these sessions and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here, a booking fee will be applied.

    08.30 – 10.30 & 11.00 – 13.00Benjamin Black & Pippa LetchworthWomens Health: Is prevention is better than cure?Ben and Pippa will be delivering this workshop on making a difference with limited experience and resources, working with Kate Yarrow on the content. This workshop is designed to give you the theory and practical approach to some basic life saving skills in Womens health; Sexual and reproductive health in humanitarian settings and basic live saving skills in obstetrics.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Pete SkeltonEarly Rehabilitation In A Disaster Setting – How To Adapt Clinical PracticeThis workshop will examine the key conditions seen in emergencies where there are overwhelming numbers of trauma patients. We will run through the most common complex conditions seen and provide a rapid overview of the key clinical points to be aware of, as well as covering adaptive practical skill stations in areas such as amputee stump bandaging and acute spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Jasmine Armour-MarshallHealthcare Provision for Displaced and Refugee Children. A viewpoint from Kurdistan.Jasmine will talk about her work with EMERGENCY, providing primary healthcare for children living in IDP and refugee camps in Kurdistan, northern Iraq. Jasmine will discuss some of the challenges and the successes providing quality healthcare in this context.

  • BOARD ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS

    9.00 – 10.30Phil McKenna – Blizzard SurvivalIO WorkshopsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning Break

    11.00 – 13.00Chris Storey & Tamara Banerjee – ATACCPenthrox Administration CoursesPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Luca CarenzoUSS SessionsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Toni MurchA stepwise approach to Haemorrhage controlThis will include the current FPHC RCS and ERC guidelines in Haemorrhage control using direct pressure, pressure dressings, haemostatic dressings and tourniquets.
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

  • CLASS ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS

    9.30 – 12.00Burjor Langdana Expedition DentistryBurjor gives his unmissable practical session on the management of common dental conditions with limited resources in austere environments.
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

    14.00 – 16.00Daniel Sedgewick, Saleyha Ahsan, Linda Dykes, Pauline Cutting & Alex RowePanelSecrets of how to have a compatible medical and expedition career / Happy junior doctors happy department – how to make it happen
    Spaces are limited for this session and must be booked in advance here.

Day 3
(Monday, November 27th)
Pre-Hospital Medicine
  • Pre-Hospital Medicine

  • BIOSPHERE:Pre-Hospital Medicine

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee

    08.30 – 08.30Welcome

    08.30 – 09.00Emily FarkasExtreme Heart Surgery: Operating Rooms from Nepal to the AmazonImagine the effort, ingenuity, and leap of faith it takes to do something as complex as cardiac surgery in underdeveloped areas with only modest support and minimal resources. Emily shares experiences & considerations from crafting her career around global surgical volunteerism.

    09.00 – 09.30Simon KingThe Elephant On The HillA re-creation of an actual elephant incident in which two people suffered serious penetrating injuries when gored by the tusks.

    09.30 – 10.00Matt EdwardsHEMs Missionary – Square Pegs and Round Holes

    10.00 – 10.30Jon ChristensenHow do you train the best medics in the world?In this talk – Jon B. Christensen, the Chief of Medical Training for the International Special Training Centre will discuss how NATO Special Operations Combat Medics (NSOCM) are on the cutting edge of medicine.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Mike SmithProlonged Care in Low Resource EnvironmentsThe remote, austere nature of current and future military operations is likely to impose prolonged care of critically ill and injured personnel on forward medical teams. This care may be delivered in a forward location whilst waiting medical evacuation or during a prolonged evacuation phase. Many of the military experiences are pertinent to those who provide medical care in remote, resource limited parts of the world. The intent is to exploit current innovations in “dig data” and sensor technologies to support clinical decision making and optimise patient care during any delay to the delivery of damage control surgery and resuscitation.

    11.30 – 12.00Simon Leigh-SmithPHEMWhat can we learn from our gaelic cousins

    12.00 – 12.30Mark ByersChemical & Biological Weapons Terrorist Event in the UKHow likely is a chemical or biological terrorist event in the UK? This lecture will explore, through open source media, the factors that make this a possibility and consider how we would recognize an event and how we should prepare.

    12.30 – 13.00Andrew MottTrauma care on the front lines: Mosul IraqThe Islamic State brutally captured the city of Mosul Iraq in summer 2014. Over the past three years, ISIS has called the city home. In February 2017 the Iraqi military launched major military operations to retake the city from ISIS, some of the most intense urban warfare in recent history. This lecture is about the medical response to this conflict through the eyes of a paramedic working alongside the Iraqi soldiers on the front lines. We will focus on trauma care considerations in war environments as well as aspects of security, transport of casualties, and unique treatment considerations in austere, low resource and highly volatile environments.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Emily Mayhew Life Beyond the Point of Wounding: First responders and unexpected survivors from the war in AfghanistanDevelopments that have made today’s cohort of unexpected survivors so important not just to military medicine and extreme medicine but to trauma medicine in general including how the role of First Responders is being re conceived not just to secure survival but also better long term outcomes.

    14.30 – 15.00Lewis HalseyIn a Deteriorating Environment, What Factor is First to Kill? The Tragedy of the Kursk Submarine AccidentIn 2000 the Russian submarine ‘The Kursk’ suffered a catastrophic accident that sent it crashing to the bottom of the Barents Sea. The few men that survived this initial event were trapped in the final two aft compartments of the submarine, and had to endure a challenging and rapidly deteriorating environment. Tragically, these men could not be rescued and succumbed after a few days. With some basic number crunching it is possible to ascertain which factors caused the death of the submariners.

    15.00 – 15.30Chris WrightUpdate On UK Military Pre-hospital Emergency CareFrom Afghanistan to the Rest of The World, re configuring military Pre-Hospital Emergency Care to cope with multiple small teams working at reach, in hostile environments.

    15.30 – 16.00Simon Leigh-SmithPHEMTension Pneumothorax ‘time for a re-think’ – 15 years later……………….

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Eoin Walker and Dan RichardsFrom Ruin To Recovery: A Soldiers StoryRoyal Fusiliers Soldier Dan Richards suffered a near fatal motor bike accident in 2009 which changed his life forever. After tearing his right arm off and breaking multiple bones throughout his body – Dan speaks of his road to recovery through the power of mental resilience and willingness not to be defeated. Eoin Walker the attending flight paramedic and trauma lead for WEM gives his account of events and how it led to the ‘save of a lifetime’ and the inspiration that Dan is to everyone he meets.

    17.00 17.30Andy GrieveTeamworking & Networks In Rural Deployed Field Care

  • SALISBURY ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSSpaces are limited for these sessions and must be booked in advance.

    08.30 – 09.30Eoin WalkerBreaking Bad News in Pre-hospital CareIn the advent of terrorism not every patient and situation turns out well. Little is taught to the pre-hospital clinician about how to break bad news yet critical care practitioners are increasingly drawn upon to deliver this life changing information. This talk will examine some of the psychology around how families/ friends receive bad news and some of the most robust techniques and experiences of good delivery within critical care.
    Spaces are limited for this session and must be booked in advance here.

    09.30 – 10.30Nick GentCBW Overview and Pre-hospital Deacon in Low Resource EnvironmentsSpaces are limited for this session and must be booked in advance here.

    11.00 – 17.30Caught in the middle of a multiple casualty terrorist attack! Would you know what to do in the vital first minutes?Three 1.5-hour sessions each beginning with a talk on ‘The evolving terrorist threat and what to do in the first crucial minutes to help keep yourself safe and save lives.
    Spaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance here.

  • HUTTON ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARSPlaces are limited for these sessions and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here, a £5 booking fee will be applied.

    9.30 – 10.30Richard Wain-Hobson, Sundeep Dhillon, Nigel Hinson & Dave WhitmoreUncharted Territory: Discussing Standards and Competencies within Expedition MedicineExpedition medicine is a sector without official guidance. This session is aimed towards promoting discussion around standard setting and guidance within expedition medicine. Should it be done? What would it look like? Will it improve the safety of expeditions? Join representatives from the Edinburgh Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care and the Royal Geographical Society’s Medical Cell and have your say.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning Break

    11.00 – 12.00John QuinnOpportunities for Working in Remote and Austere Environments. My Experience From Conflict Zones – Ukraine to MosulJohn has had many opportunities to work within disaster and war medicine; as a pre medical student, EMT, paramedic, global health diplomat and doctor. John will tell his story and offer novel avenues for anyone looking to get involved and help their fellow human beings establish health security, especially for those most vulnerable.

    12.00 – 12.30Liam TownendBlood on the Floor and Four More – visual estimation of external blood loss by UK pre-hospital clinicians.Haemorrhage accounts for 30-40% of trauma deaths globally with delays in recognising and treating hypovolaemia resulting in poorer patient outcomes. Liam will be presenting the results of a project involving the use of simulated trauma scenarios with information gathered from a wide range of pre-hospital clinicians. Discussion will cover the accuracy and usefulness of visual estimation and its place in the trauma handover at ED.

    12.30 – 13.00Mike DaysonAn Introduction To The Extrication In Trauma Project.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Nick GentPre-hospital Chemical Decontamination Scenarios

    15.00 – 16.00a href=”http://www.extrememedicineexpo.com/conference-speakers/simon-king/”>Simon KingA Strategic Targets Framework for Medical Readiness in ParksAn orientation to the most comprehensive strategic plan framework for anyone looking after people in the world’s Protected Areas. It combines an evidence base of some 12 000 medical events with the UNWTO’s Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, resulting in a flexible framework of achievable and relevant strategic targets. This framework provides the structure for anyone to build a better site-specific Medical Plan. It’s a practical to-do list that will help doctors supporting operators in Parks avoid common pitfalls.

  • BOARD ROOM: WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS

    9.00 – 10.30Phil McKenna – Blizzard SurvivalIO WorkshopsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning Break

    11.00 – 13.00Chris Storey & Tamara Banerjee – ATACCPenthrox Administration CoursesPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Luca CarenzoUSS SessionsPlaces are limited for this workshop and must be booked in advance, you can book your place here.

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