Extreme Medicine Conference Series
International World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo
Medicine, the most exciting job on earth

Programme

We have some extremely exciting content and globally renowned speakers lined up for November’s World Extreme Medicine Conference, under the key areas of Extreme, Expedition, Wilderness & Extreme Medicine, Disaster & Humanitarian Medicine and Pre-hospital medicine.

As always, speakers and content are subject to change, so please do check back regularly for updates to the schedule in the run up to the conference. Thank you.

The World Extreme Medicine Conference is organised as ‘Not for Profit’ activity by WEM.

Event overview
Compare schedules
Day 1
(Saturday, November 25th)
Extreme, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine and workshops/ seminars
  • The outline for 2017 will be confirmed later but please for reference see below for the 2016 schedule.

     

  • Biosphere: Extreme, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee

    08.30 – 08.30Welcome

    08.30 – 09.00Introducing Extreme Medicine

    09.00 – 10.00The future of space travel – Michael Barratt considers whether humans readyThe exciting new frontier of travel and medicine, but are we ready.

    10.00 – 10.30Preparing for medical events in space: Developing a Field Medical Training curriculum for the European Space AgencyJohn Cherry from the Space Medicine Office and the Training Division of the European Astronaut Centre have developed hands-on medical skills training for non-physician astronauts, preparing for future space flight. With specialised consultation, the FMT considers the likelihood of medical events in spaceflight, their mission impact, and the courses of action to treat them.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.45Adaptations to altitude – lessons from the animal kingdomA range of intrepid adventurers travel to high altitude every year in the Himalayas, Andes and other mountain ranges of the world. Among these adventurers are not just human mountaineers but also various species of birds, which migrate between breeding and wintering areas and pass over mountain ranges between the two. This talk with Lucy Hawkes and Chris Imray, will outline why birds are able to cope with the huge energetic demands of flight even in very low oxygen conditions and illustrates this with empirical data from two amazing bird species.

    11.45 – 12.30Advances in the prevention of AMS, HACE and HAPE Andrew Luks‘ lecture will review recent advances in the prevention of the main forms of acute altitude illness with an emphasis on both pharmacologic measures as well as non-pharmacologic approaches including high altitude tents and other pre-acclimatization strategies.

    12.30 – 13.00Accidental hypothermia from the “first-in-man” rewarming by Cardio-Pulmonary Bypass
    to Extracorporeal Life Support
    Deep accidental hypothermia may cause cardiac arrest, a life-threatening condition. Cardio-pulmonary bypass rewarming was pioneered in the ‘80s in Switzerland by Beat Walpoth, thus 50% of such victims in apparent death could be revived with little or no sequelae. Innovative technologies such as Extra Corporeal Life Support now yield a higher survival rate.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Cold water immersion, sudden death and survival with Mike Tipton.

    14.30 – 15.00Managing hypothermia, the Norwegian experienceMany years ago a young doctor fell through the ice and survived the lowest recorded core temperature. Meet Mads Gilbert, the doctor who managed her hospital resuscitation

    15.00 – 16.00Heat injury and human adaptationWhat can we learn about human adaptation to a hot environment from the animal kingdom and how do we prevent and manage heat related injuries in the field. With Sundeep Dhillon and Michael Scantlebury.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Extreme divers in the animal kingdom: Cardio-respiratory “tricks” from the true masters of submergenceHumans struggle to dive unaided for more than ten minutes, yet many other animals, such as turtles, crocodiles and seals are able to stay submerged for more than an hour.  Craig Franklin’s talk will compare the diving feats of humans and the extreme divers in the animal kingdom and then detail the remarkable cardio-respiratory adaptations of seals, turtles and crocodiles enabling them to remain underwater for extended periods.  Along the way you will be introduced to the most sophisticated and complex cardiovascular system in the animal kingdom.

    17.00 – 17.45Recent advances in managing cold injuriesChris Imray will consider how we manage frostbite and NFCIs in the field and what are the recent advances in hospital treatment.

    17.45 – 18.00Intermission

    18.00 – 19.00How far is too far? The 1st ascent of Nanga Parbat via the Mazeno ridge.Cathy O’Dowd was one of six climbers who basecamp for an alpine-style first ascent of Nanga Parbat via the Mazeno ridge, carrying 10 days of food and fuel. The ridge lies at 23,000 feet, is 5 miles long and involves traversing eight peaks before reaching the main massif. Two of the team reached the summit after 14 days (12 nights sleeping at 23,000 feet and above) and then took another four days to descend, without food or water. Cathy O’Dowd, a member of the team, tells the tale of this epic ascent.

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Bioshpere Blue:Vulnerable Populations in Humanitarian Disasters

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee

    08.30 – 09.00Women as a vulnerable population.We will explore and gain a better understanding of the specific problems experienced by women in the context of a disaster.

    09.00 – 09.30Obstetric challenges in low resource and mobile populations.

    09.30 – 10.00Sexual and domestic violence in a conflict and humanitarian context.

    10.00 – 10.30Human rights in womens health care.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning Break

    11.00 – 13.00Excellence Series in Obstetrics and Gynaecology presented in partnership with
    the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG): Resus
    Resus in obstetric emergencies
    Managing the unconscious obstetric patient
    Resuscitation of the neonate

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Excellence Series in Obstetrics and Gynaecology with RCOG: Obstetric EmergencyPostpartum and antepartum haemorrhage: recognition and management
    Volume replacement in the pregnant woman
    Pre-eclampsia: recognition and management

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Excellence Series in Obstetrics and Gynaecology with RCOG: NeonatalAntenatal and puerperal sepsis and temperatures in the neonate

    Programme awaiting finalisation

  • Salisbury Room: Workshops /Seminars

    08.30 – 10.30Psychological First AidPFA involves providing humane, supportive and practical help to people who have experienced serious crisis events such as disasters. This practical, participatory training with Peter Skelton and Arij Bou Reslan Skelton is aimed at humanitarian health workers and is based on the WHO Psychological First Aid training guide, including a section specifically adapted for use with those who have experienced potentially life changing injuries.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Personal kit preparation for a deploymentWhat would Sean Hudson pack for a rapid or planned deployment to a disaster zone?

    11.30 – 12.00change to schedule

    12.00 – 12.30Logistics in humanitarian disastersWhat goes on around the medical deployment which enables it to deploy, function and return safely. Emily Knox of the Red Cross tells all.

    12.30 – 13.00Training for disaster response

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Naked and Afraid: The 6 skills of effective medical practice in remote locationsWild environments are always resource poor. Medical problems you could handle easily in your fully-kitted practice, or a modern hospital, feel unmanageable in the big, far outdoors. If you add dangerous animals, people or weather, it becomes downright intimidating. You don’t need the plethora of existing research to know that your performance is going to deteriorate out there. The six skills are drawn from current research on 10,000 cases in remote Africa. Simon King, a guide, doctor and teacher, will walk you through the “headology” that makes the difference between stable, effective practice and looking in people’s eyes, wishing you had done better. With thanks to Simon King, you will leave with strategies that make you a better practitioner out there – and back at home

    15.00 – 15.30HALO Trust: Emergency medicine in minefields and areas affected by war.The Halo Trust is the largest humanitarian landmine clearance organisation working in 19 countries and territories. Jamie Willson tells us about his experiences as the trust doctor Somalia, Afghanistan and Nagorna-Karabakh.

    15.30 – 16.00Responsible medical donations and sourcing supplies for medical missions.In many countries drugs shortages are a regular occurrence. Limited access to cheap and high quality medicines can lead to patients cutting treatments short which can prolong a health problem, increase the likelihood of drug resistance, place a unmanageable financial burden on the patients back or push them to black market or poor quality alternatives.
    This seminar/workshop will focus on the practicalities of sourcing medicines for medical work in resource poor environments. The seminar with Patrick Keys will explore the routes one can take to source medical supplies and medicines with a particular focus on the costs, benefits and feasibility of the options available to the medic.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Security challenges of a disaster responsePeter Higgins gives us his thoughts.

    17.30Close

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Hutton Rm: Workshops / Seminars

    08.30 – 09.00Programme starts at 09.00am

    09.00 – 09.30International Medical Corps’ response to disastersLessons learnt from the Ebola crisis and Nepal

    09.30 – 10.00Journey to a disaster zone – lessons from the Philippines and NepalTim Byrom draws on his experiences of deployments to Libya, Turkey, The Philippines and Nepal to examine what it is really like to deploy overseas in a humanitarian capacity. Examples discussed include teaching/ mentoring, working within an international field hospital and pre-hospital operations. His varied experiences provide insight into what you might expect when deployed, challenging some preconceptions of what it may involve and therefore helping better prepare you for future deployments.

    10.00 – 10.30Challenges to healthcare in the HimalayasWesterners on expedition to mountainous regions have the luxury of expensive safety equipment and insurance for repatriation in event of a disaster. But how do locals cope living in the harsh Himalayan mountain terrain, and what challenges do they face on a daily basis? Dr Kate Yarrow (founder of Doctors For Nepal) offers a unique insight into the medical challenges of life in the Himalayas, from both the patient and doctor’s perspective. With clips from a Hollywood award winning documentary, come and get a taste for mountain medicine as you have never seen it before.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 12.00Anaesthesia equipment for the travelling anaesthetistExplanation of new developments in Drawover anaesthesia equipment
    Hands on workshop with portable anaesthesia and ventilation equipment for outreach and disaster situations. Demonstration of equipment for situations where there is no electricity or compressed gases.

    12.00 – 13.00Penthrox Administrator Course.ATACC Group is the official training provider for the Penthrox emergency pain relief inhaler & ordinarily this workshop would cost £99 but it is delivered to you today without charge. Workshop attendees will receive a certificate and can claim CPD points through their appraisal system. (Note: Licencing rules limit this session to UK & ROI physicians, nurses & paramedics only)

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Advanced USS

    17.30Close

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • BoardRoom: Workshops

    11.00 – 13.00Expedition DentistryBurjor Langdana gives his unmissable practical session on the management of common dental conditions with limited resources in austere environments.

    * Draft programme only. Content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Class Room: USS Workshop

    11.00 – 13.00USS Introduction:A grounding in the basics of USS use and value in the pre-hospital environment

  • Evening

Day 2
(Sunday, November 26th)
Disaster and Humanitarian Medicine
  • The outline for 2017 will be confirmed later but please for reference see below for the 2016 schedule.

  • Biosphere: Disaster & Humanitarian Medicine

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee

    08.30 – 08.30Welcome

    08.30 – 09.00Trauma surgery at the sharp end With David Nott, Remarkable and inspirational.

    09.00 – 10.00Medics Under Fire, a panel discussion and Q&AIntroduced by John Sweeney, with David Nott, Natalie Roberts, Saleyha Ahsan & Mads Gilbert.

    10.00 – 10.30Organising medical care in remote and dangerous environmentsMartin Bricknell will tell us about the UK Defence Medical Services approach.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30The Future of developmental aid.With Dominic O’Neill from DFID.

    11.30 – 11.30Facing the challenges of the refugee crisis in the Middle East and EuropeJavid Abdelmoneim suggests that we are facing one the the most dramatic humanitarian events of our generation. Pulling up the drawbridge is not the answer.

    12.00 – 12.30Professionalising the international response to disastersWith the guidance of Tony Redmond, the UK has been at the forefront of ensuring a professional medical response to a disaster. In conjunction with the WHO, the UK is helping to create the structure which ensures appropriately trained medical professionals deliver the right care to the right people during disasters. The three types of emergency team response will be explained and UK-Med’s training pathway explored.

    12.30 – 13.00Mads Gilbert and Saleyha Ahsan will discuss their experience of delivering medical aid in complex emergencies and the capacity to deliver delivering continued aid.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.10Crisis communications: Liberia and Ebola

    14.10 – 14.30Chemical weapons – a new normal?CBRN expert Hamish de Bretton Gordon considers the implications of their use.

    14.30 – 15.00Steve Mannion tells us about Delivering orthopaedic surgical needs in low resource environmentsHow do we ensure the best practice in the most challenging environments.

    15.00 – 15.30Women and children in conflict Saleyha Ahsan highlights how they represent over 2/3s of a population and are frequently the target of violence and abuse when the social infrastructure fails.

    15.30 – 16.00The psychology of human performance and health in extreme settingsDuring the lecture Nathan Smith will provide an overview of a recent synthesis project on personnel selection, coping and stress-resilience, and reintegration-transition from extreme settings. The presentation will be supplemented with findings from his own research in this area, which has been published in leading international journals presented at conferences around the world.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Emergency medical response from Day 1 of a crisis Natalie Roberts tells us that whether it is a natural disaster, conflict, epidemic or refugee crisis, medics arriving to scenes of chaos need to be able to hit the ground running.

    17.00 – 17.30Civilian military collaboration and the changing face of disaster responseAndy Hill of DFID highlights the possibilities if we have a unified civ/mil response; and the challenges.

    17.30 – 18.00The complexities of the conflict in Syria.David Nott and Toby Cadman, international law specialist consider how medical and legal representatives may develop strategies to monitor future conflict.

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Salisbury Room: Workshops & Seminars

    09.00 – 10.30 Intentionally blank

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 12.00Opportunities in remote and austere locationsThe panel draw from their extensive experience to give the audience an understanding of how to make a career in remote medicine.

    12.00 – 12.30HRA – The Himalayan Rescue AssociationThe HRA has been providing medical care in the mountains for decades.
    Rachel Anderson tells us that the highest emergency department in the world at Everest Base Camp has some lessons for us all.

    12.30 – 13.00Tropical medicine updateJim Bond gives us a round-up of new discoveries and practical developments in the past couple of years that mostly haven’t made mainstream headlines.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Managing medical emergencies in remote environmentsThe panel will present and discuss their most interesting and challenging medical evacuations.

    15.00 – 15.30Water management and waterborne diseasePaul Richards will give a practical approach to ensuring your expedition remain healthy – Its all about the water…

    15.30 – 16.00Envenomation in austere and remote locationsA practical look at the challenges of dealing with terrestrial envenomation in remote and austere locations.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.15Establishing communication networks for remote deploymentsExpedition Communication – how might I communicate from anywhere in the world with search and rescue and check in with my Mum. Nigel Harling gives us an idea of the best equipment to use.

    17.15 – 17.30British Exploring Society: Creating bespoke expeditions to wild and remote overseas locations in order to challenge and positively transform the lives of young people.BES explorers return from expeditions with the mental toughness to succeed in life – and with the appetite to take control of their lives. BES’ unique approach is supported by well-trained, high calibre professional volunteers who donate hundreds of professional hours to us every year.

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Hutton Room: Workshops & Seminars

    08.30 – 10.3009.00 – 09.30Intentionally blank

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 13.00Physiotherapy in the austere environmentMusculo-skeletal injuries are the most common medical problems on expedition. How do we practically deal with the most common injuries and maintain function in the field. This 2hour workshop with Baz Bassi and Jen Jackson will focus on techniques for management of both acute, traumatic injuries as well as overuse injuries and will provide practical skills that you can use when out in the field to help maintain function and keep your athlete on the move. Practical skills will include strapping, Kinesiology taping techniques, exercise therapy, manual therapy and soft tissue techniques. The workshop will also examine prevention strategies and pre-screening.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock in extreme environments Join Pat Thompson for the theory behind the practical application of Whole Blood Field Donation and Transfusion (Buddy Transfusion)

    15.00 – 16.00Practicalities of Managing Altitude-Related Illness. Andrew Luks’ lecture will review the practical aspects of managing the primary acute altitude illnesses — AMS, HACE and HAPE — in the field and hospital setting including use of portable hyperbaric chambers.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Sub Zero Aqua – Surviving Polar divingSub-zero temperatures. Very remote locations. Dynamic ice conditions. Large, dangerous animals. An inherently hazardous activity. What could possibly go wrong? Polar diver and explorer Kelvin Murray shares some of his top tips on working and diving in extreme and remote environments.

    17.00 – 17.30Lightning strikes MCI at 13000 feet:On July 21, 2010 three parties of climbers were struck by lightning near the summit of the Grand Teton (13,770 feet/4075 meters).  The ensuing rescue was the largest single rescue effort in the national park’s history, involving 17 patients and considerable resources.  Dr. Will Smith directed the medical operations of the rescue and will discuss how the Wilderness Mass Causality Incident (MCI) unfolded in a technical wilderness setting and the treatment of the lightning injuries encountered.

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Boardroom: Workshops

    08.30 – 10.30Facial TraumaBurjor Langdana gives an intensive hands on workshop which will give participants an opportunity to learn and practice Jaw Wiring , Anterior and Posterior Nasal Packing and reduction and stabilisation of a Dislocated Lower Jaw.

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    12.00 – 13.00

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 16.00Wound dressing in the fieldA practical session on the management of wounds in remote locations

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Class Room: USS Workshop

    09.30 – 10.30Naked and Afraid: The 6 skills of effective medical practice in remote locationsWild environments are always resource poor. Medical problems you could handle easily in your fully-kitted practice, or a modern hospital, feel unmanageable in the big, far outdoors. If you add dangerous animals, people or weather, it becomes downright intimidating. You don’t need the plethora of existing research to know that your performance is going to deteriorate out there. The six skills are drawn from current research on 10,000 cases in remote Africa. Simon King, a guide, doctor and teacher, will walk you through the “headology” that makes the difference between stable, effective practice and looking in people’s eyes, wishing you had done better. With thanks to Simon King, you will leave with strategies that make you a better practitioner out there – and back at home

    11.00 – 13.00USS Introduction:A grounding in the basics of USS use and value in the pre-hospital environment

    16.30 – 17.30The Personal PR Tool KitTina Fotherby will run a workshop that will provide valuable information for anyone who may be in the public’s eye – either deliberately or accidentally – and subsequently be the subject of media attention. She will reveal a checklist of seven key tips to help make sure that any messaging lands well and that people are well prepared to manage challenging situations.

  • Evening

Day 3
(Monday, November 27th)
Pre-Hospital Medicine
  • The outline for 2017 will be confirmed later but please for reference see below for the 2016 schedule.

  • Biosphere:Pre-Hospital Medicine

    07.30 – 08.30Registration & Coffee

    08.30 – 08.30Welcome

    08.30 – 09.00The speed of trust with Matt Edwards and Piers CarterTeams which trust each other and are confident in their abilities work in parallel and function faster and at a higher level.

    09.00 – 09.30Reading the sceneIn this talk, Theo Weston hopes to cover various aspects of what is involved with reading the scene of an incident or pre-hospital medical emergency; this doesn’t just mean using the information in front of us to work out what injuries to predict but also helps with how to manage the scene, what hazards to look out for & how this might impact on the rescuers & the bystanders as well as the casualty. This information will also give a clue about the degree of urgency needed in managing the situation. By the end of the talk I hope that delegates will be some way towards becoming real time “Medical CSI’s”!!!

    09.30 – 10.00Anaesthesia and analgesia in challenging environmentsWith limited resources and in austere environments Rachel Craven tells us how we can deliver safe and effective anaesthesia and appropriate analgesia

    10.00 – 10.30Advances in fluid resuscitation in austere environmentsWith Ross Hemmingway

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 11.30Challenging paediatric emergencies pre-hospitalThis session with Jon McCormack will outline some of the key issues in managing the critically injured child in the pre-hospital context. The differing pathophysiology of major trauma in children will be highlighted along with suggestions for appropriate treatment algorithms. In acknowledgement to the psychological challenges presented to practitioners when managing paediatric trauma, cognitive processes to facilitate team decision making will be proposed.

    12.00 – 12.30Mass medical response to an active terrorist attack in a public placeThe challenges of mass casualty and capacity within the NHS

    12.30 – 13.00Major incident management and the Glasgow experienceWith Neil Dignon

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30USS in remote and austere environmentsWith Tim Harris

    14.30 – 15.00Is Cardiac arrest management all about medical innovation and technical ability?Eoin Walker considers, as the chain or survival is reinforced are there external factors that can optimise your link in the chain?

    15.00 – 15.30Surviving a pre-hospital cardiac arrestZoe Hitchcock, a healthy 29 year old suffers cardiac arrest on London’s busy Oxford St. Meet her and hear her story.

    15.30 – 16.00Multi-agency coordination in major incidents – Exercise Unified ResponseWith Shaun Rock

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    17.00 – 17.30Critical care challengesWith Neil Thomson

    Programme subject to change.

  • Salisbury Room: Workshops & Seminars

    08.30 – 09.00Haemorrhage and vascular controlwith James Rouse

    09.00 – 09.30Pre-hospital airway managementwith Andrew Dunne

    09.30 – 10.00Pre-hospital chest traumawith Tom Konig

    10.00 – 10.30 Awaiting confirmation

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 12.00Bringing combat medicine to the streets of EMSAdvancement of prehospital care on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan is pushing a new approach to EMS. Will Smith considers how these experiences should be implemented in the streets of EMS here at home? This lecture will look at some of the hot topics of tourniquet use, hemostatic agents and rearranging our ABC’s to CAB. Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) and Rescue Task Force (RTF) concepts will be introduced as an approach to mass violence and active shooter situations

    12.00 – 12.30Patient packaging and the MIST handoverJoin Paul Dilloway’s practical approach to ensuring a casualty is transferred safely from one location to another and the appropriate information is handed over in a succinct fashion

    12.30 – 13.00The pre-hospital care debriefAn essential but often forgotten element of the care of a trauma patient. James Rouse asks “what did we do and how could we have done it better?”

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 14.30Developing the right medical kitIn the pre-hospital and remote environment the care of a patient is often limited by the kit available. Join Raj Joshi who help to ensure we all have the right kit at the right time for the right patient.

    14.30 – 15.00The agitated patientAndrew Dunne asks how do we manage the most difficult patients – the agitated trauma patient

    15.00 – 16.00Prolonged field care: A practical guide to keeping a casualty alive when evacuation times are protracted. Kenny Johnston gives a review of current prolonged field care models adopted by the Defence Medical Services, comparing this to the other concepts that exist in the wider arena. The current lines of development which are being established to form the foundation for the future of Prolonged Field Care within the British Military.

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.00Approach to traumatic cardiac arrest HEMSwith Richard McGirr

    17.00 – 17.30Working in a chemical weapon incident: In this engaging session, Dan Fletcher looks at the practical and human side of managing and decontaminating casualties.

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Hutton Room: Workshops & Seminars

    10.30 – 11.00Morning break

    11.00 – 12.15The surgical airway A practical approach to the surgical airway in a prehospital austere environment. In a small group workshop, Tim Lowes will discuss the indications for undertaking a surgical airway along with a discussion and demonstration of the various techniques and available kit for this procedure. Candidates will have the opportunity to practice the technique and to discuss the potential problems that may occur

    12.30 – 13.00Conflict and disaster medicine: The state of battlefield medicine in Ukraine 2016Ukraine is at war with Russia and Russian militant proxies. Ukraine is still in transition to a stable modern state from that of a fragile one teetering on state failure. Owing to the difficulties associated with severing Soviet era state institutional ties with Russia, the birth of a modern Ukrainian State remains elusive and fragile. The new sovereign Ukraine seeks to be connected to the world in a transparent fashion and accountable to a European order which encourages health security and access to primary healthcare for its citizens.

    John Quinn describes some of the institutional issues related to health and conclude that prevention is the best medicine and that state institutional capacity strengthening and resilience, accountability and transparency promote health most effectively. This is best accomplished by telling a story of ODC collaboration and coordination from TCCC to prolonged field care; where it has been and where it is going. This brief commentary describes the human cost from 2014 – 2016 from conflict and offers some prescriptive policy considerations that may continue the state transition of Ukraine into a stable and sovereign nation by promoting health security

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00Penthrox Administrator Course.ATACC Group is the official training provider for the Penthrox emergency pain relief inhaler & ordinarily this workshop would cost £99 but it is delivered to you today without charge. Workshop attendees will receive a certificate and can claim CPD points through their appraisal system. (Note: Licencing rules limit this session to UK & ROI physicians, nurses & paramedics only)

    15.00 – 16.00Resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock in extreme environmentsPat Thompson gives a practical application of Whole Blood Field Donation and Transfusion (Buddy Transfusion)

    16.00 – 16.30Afternoon break

    16.30 – 17.30Care Under Fire & Tactical Combat Casualty CareOutside with Grant, Gaz and Les, weather permitting

    * Draft programme only. content subject to confirmation closer to conference time

  • Boardroom: WORKSHOPS

    11.00 – 13.00Facial TraumaBurjor Langdana gives an intensive hands on workshop which will give participants an opportunity to learn and practice Jaw Wiring , Anterior and Posterior Nasal Packing and reduction and stabilisation of a Dislocated Lower Jaw.

    13.00 – 14.00Lunch

    14.00 – 15.00IO AccessA practical session with Tom Harcourt-Williams and Phil Murray on how to achieve IO access

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